The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

200px-Kite_runner I have been holding “The Kite Runner” for a long time; moving it between my different books shelfs, my reading areas and even different bags – but I never really started reading it till last week. When I did start reading it, I finished it even before I realized. The story is about many things, but most importantly it is about friendship. A friendship between Amir; a privileged member of a dominant tribe and Hassan; his devoted servant. To hide an act of cowardice, Amir gives up on his friendship with Hassan and ensures that he is sent out of his house. For Amir too, things change when a war starts and he and his dad flee to the United States. Many years later, after his father’s demise Amir comes to know that Hassan was more than just a devoted servant. It is time for him to return the favor; but will he cave in because of his cowardice or stand up.

To begin with; the book had some excellent descriptions about the country and the places that Hassan and Amir lived in. The ignorance of the children visible in the games they played, Amir’s attempts to please his father and his sadness when things do not work in his favor and the uncle who is more father to him than his dad was; all reminded me of a very serene and normal environment. When the friends drift away from each other abruptly it broke my heart. I thought what every other reader must have, that Amir was a selfish and arrogant child and would grow up to be despicable. When he had to flee to the United States, I thought roles would change and that in a foreign country he would be the underprivileged one. I was glad that the story took a new and different turn. It was anything else but predictable.

I specially liked that the characters were all clearly defined and played their roles with the utmost justice. The emotions were duly sincere and equally raw in all the different scenes. The contrast of events, characters and situations was deep-rooted, honest and real. Like for instance, the portrayal of the area where the children live a carefree life and the drastic change of the same vicinity when Amir visits it after many years. Amir’s act of cowardice when he fails to save Hassan and his courage when he has to save Hassan’s son are just some examples of the contrasts depicted.

In my opinion “The Kite Runner” is a candid book, filled with honesty. The writing is almost flawless and enjoyable. An interesting read and hence a quick one.

Four smiley faces is fair
HappyFaceHappyFaceHappyFaceHappyFace


 

kavyen

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