Soul Identity by Dennis Batchelder

The Book:

Soul IdentityScott Waverly, a security consultant receives two yellow packages containing a flashlight called a “soul identity reader” from a company claiming his help. To start a business relationship, he is asked to provide his soul identity by taking pictures of his eyes. Before calling the delivery man to pick the return package, he and his parents decide to play a joke by taking pictures of the bluefish they just caught.

A week later he notices the same delivery man being chased down by his neighbour. Curiosity gets the best of him and Scott decides to spend some time with Mr. Berry. He soon realizes that Mr. Berry believes in re-incarnation and is disappointed that Soul Identity refused to induct him because of his glass eye. He also mentions that he visited a palm reading shop run by Madam Flora some time back and the very next day a person from soul identity contacted him. Scott promises to help Mr.Berry and with the clues he has with him, starts trying to understand more about the organization and the help they need from him.

Once in, Scott realizes that the organization is in fact legitimate and has a wide range of believers. He was being called in to help with the internet security but he soon discovers a bigger scam. Can Scott deliver what he has promised or is the overseer Archibald expecting too much from him? Will he survive the greedy enemy and save the company?

The View:

I downloaded this e-book on my kindle with obvious doubts that I would never get to it. The reviews state that this book is about an organization trying to track your soul’s future and I instantly felt a sense of disbelief. I think it is that strong disbelief that prompted me to read this book. Once I started, I felt that there was some substance and obvious thought into what had been written. What also carried me through the book was that the protagonist Scott Waverly does not believe the concept himself and the whole story is driven only by his passion to help the organization and seek the truth.

The story line was interesting but the book had too many diversions – a company that claims they can identify your soul through images of your eyes, a non-believer security consultant, many believers, a buddhist monk, an outsourced development firm in India and a sprinkle of romance with a surprisingly beautiful computer geek. A lot of effort had also been put into convincing us of the concept specially when Archibald explains the organization’s history. The twist with the overseer added some essence and played a vital role in carrying the book forward.

Some of the characters were not well-developed but Scott was like-able, smart, witty and determined. I particularly liked his parents who were game for any adventure that he was throwing their way. Madam Flora and her two grand children added some spice and the tragic cooking episodes reminded me of my past experiments in the kitchen.

Soul Identity has a unique concept and when you put the book down you don’t do it with an idle mind. The book leaves you wondering what you would do if you could track your soul in the future. Would you want to save up for it or let destiny take its turn one more time? I want to rate this a 3.5 but in order to stick with whole numbers this will be a 3 on 5.

Oh, before I forget all the technical jargon did a lot of good.

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3 Responses

  1. kavyen: thanks for giving Soul Identity a go!

  2. Hi Dennis, Thanks for stopping by. Like I mentioned the book was one that got me thinking and fictions rarely have that effect on me. I am hoping to read “Soul Intent” soon and have it on my TBR.

  3. I downloaded the book on my kobo, it was a free book and decided to give it a shot. once i got into it i could not set it down it is an amazing read

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